Traverse Workflow in Trimble RealWorks

Trimble RealWorks allows you to perform a traverse type registration workflow even if your laser scanner may not have the capability in the field software.

In the video below Jason Hayes, product manager for Trimble RealWorks, gives us a 25 minute tutorial to show us how.

A Trimble S9, lost….and found in just 30 minutes!

When an opportunistic theft by moped resulted in Central Alliance losing a Trimble s9 they notified the police and KOREC, the local Trimble dealer.

All new Trimble S-Series Total Stations come with L2P (Locate2Protect) built-in, so the KOREC Technical Support was able to locate the instrument and track it live. When the instrument position remained static, KOREC sent the latitude and longitude of the missing instrument. It was retrieved from the bush where it had been dumped, unharmed and needing nothing more than a check.

Principal Land Surveyor Milen Charov said, “KOREC’s response couldn’t have been faster. The down-time caused by the loss of an instrument along with the hassle of dealing with insurance claims is extremely inconvenient. L2P is a great service and it’s saved us trouble, time and money. After an incident like this we have realised how important the locator functionality is. It’s absolutely worth it and I strongly recommend it.”

L2P finds an asset’s location by receiving a GPS signal from a clear line of sight with satellites in the sky. If your equipment and goes indoors (in a garage or storage facility), the L2P A-GPS technology takes over the tracking. This gives it the ability to find an asset’s location both indoors and outdoors down to the city street level address.

L2P comes standard with the later version total stations and can also be retrofitted into your S3, S6 or S8 total stations.

See the original story about Central Alliance on the KOREC website, or learn more about L2P on the Trimble website.

Improve your Mobile Field Service Performance

Mobile devices are allowing employees in the field to gather data, discuss problems, and access diagnostic tools and manuals, more easily than ever before.

But are we making the most of mobile technology?

Whether you are looking to ‘go mobile’ for the first time or improve your current mobility strategy, watch this recorded webinar to learn how you can transform your service delivery performance through increased connectivity.

Trimble Pulse staff will be joined by guest speakers, Safelite AutoGlass and MaseTec, and will cover:

  • The top factors driving field service organisations to make investments in mobility solutions
  • The challenges service executives are facing around mobile rollouts
  • The tools, technologies and best practice approaches to setting up an effective mobile strategy

Watch the recorded webinar now.

Read the latest Technology&more!

The latest issue of Technology&more has been released by Trimble.

This issue focuses around the challenges and opportunities that change brings for geospatial professionals and features individuals and organisations that are embracing these opportunities. In Russia, geospatial technologies play central roles in the efficient construction of a new skyscraper. In California, specialists in airport data management use a unique laser scanning approach to handle complex problems in asset management at a major international airport. In the Caribbean, GNSS supports scientists who are studying the effects of rising sea levels, while outside Washington, D.C., a BIM-based project will protect the region’s water quality. And there are lots more

Read the latest edition of Technology&more here.

Satellite data monitoring environmental impacts

As we use the Earth’s resources, we inevitably impact it, in particular resources that are acquired from under the surface, like coal seam gas (GCS). Currently limited evidence is available on the environmental impacts of GCS.1

To gain a clearer understanding of the environmental impacts caused by GCS production, a project is now underway in NSW. It began in March 2016 and will be run for four years to monitor movements of the Earth’s surface. It is being conducted by Geoscience Australia and the NSW Department of Industry’s Division of Resources in the town of Camden.

The project will use a combination of new and historic satellite imagery and GNSS data to measure any ground subsidence. It will also use a network of 20 geodetic monitoring stations to check for indications of increased seismic activity.

camdenThese monitoring stations consist of a mounted GNSS receiver and a pair of radar reflectors, which will provide easily detectable reference points in the satellite imagery. The GNSS data will be transmitted in real time and measured monthly to provide an independent dataset of ground movements.

Research results from the Camden environmental monitoring project will be published on the NSW Department of Industry Resources & Energy website.

Read more about the Camden project on the Spacial Source blog, or find out more about the monitoring solutions Trimble offers on our website.

 

1 The coal seam gas debate, Dr Alex St John, Science, Technology, Environment and Resources

grey-800x21