Version Upgrades

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Having the latest version means your software has the latest features and advances. That’s why we’re bringing you the latest updates from Trimble.

 

Trimble Access v2016.12

This version resolves a number of issues with then new Additional string feature.
See the release notes to find out more.

Trimble 4D Control v4.6 Now Available

Trimble have announced the latest version of the Trimble 4D Control monitoring software, version 4.6. This version provides exciting new capabilities and advanced features for the analysis of monitoring projects.

See more of the new features.

Don’t forget the upcoming leap second

A leap second has been added to 2016. It will occur at midnight on the 31st December (UTC). Trimble has made every effort to ensure their receivers will work seamlessly through the leap second. To make certain that you have no problems with the leap second in 2017 ensure that your Trimble hardware has the latest firmware and that your software is upgraded to the latest updates and patches.

 


 

It’s easy to stay up to date when you are Trimble Protected.

If you would like further information on any of these version upgrades, please contact your local UPG office.

Be prepared for the leap second

leapsecond-250x150A leap second has been added to 2016. It will occur at midnight on the 31st December (UTC). The last occurred on the 30th June 2015. Chances are, if you didn’t notice that one, and you’ve kept your firmware and software up to date, you won’t notice this one. As Trimble has made every effort to ensure their receivers will work seamlessly through the leap second.

What is a leap second?
A leap second is an adjustment to Coordinated Universal Time (UTC) to account for the slowing rotation of the earth. Leap seconds were introduced in 1972 to simplify adjustments to UTC (one of the successors to Greenwich Mean Time and) the primary regulator of world time. Leap seconds are only applied as needed and since their inception we have had 26 leap seconds.

Not only does that mean that 2016 will be another second longer, but also that the GLONASS time scale will be adjusted, as it uses UTC in its time systems.

Be prepared for the leap second
To make certain that you have no problems with the leap second in 2017 ensure that your Trimble hardware has the latest firmware and that your software is upgraded to the latest updates and patches.

GNSS receivers operate at their best performance if they are on the latest firmware. It’s easy to stay up to date when you are Trimble Protected. If you are under maintenance or have a receiver less than 12 months old please check the software version and update it if necessary.

The leap second will occur at midnight UTC time, meaning Australian GNSS users will need to monitor their GNSS receivers at 11.00am on Sunday the 1st in AEDT and 10.00am in AEST.

If you do experience difficulties after the leap second, best practice would be to reset your receiver. On most models this is done by turning the receiver off, then holding down the ‘on button’ for just over 30 seconds on start-up. The receiver may then take a few minutes to reacquire satellites.

Trimble recommend being vigilant with any continuously operating receivers for monitoring, real time networks, etc. Trimble suggest monitoring all receivers during this period.

You can find out more, including how all Trimble GPS/GNSS receiver firmware will behave in the Trimble Support Note.

If you have any questions, or need assistance in updating your software contact your local UPG office.

Trending towards the Internet of Things

iot-250x150According to the INTERGEO report for 2016 “Geospatial technologies are definitely trending towards the Internet of Things”.

The Internet of Things, or IoT describe how more and more things are connecting to the internet. Things like your fridge, your phone, washing machine and now even your watch. On an enterprise-level, examples include smart meters in the utilities market, and tilt sensors in rail monitoring. All of these devices are producing incredible geospatial data streams. And this data is invaluable because, when analysed, it can provide patterns that enable intelligent decision-making.

Positioning systems such as GNSS and internal measurement units will be part of a broader hierarchy network of sensors, control devices and user interaction. Positioning and visualising technologies, already are a critical component in autonomous vehicles. They rely on GNSS for real-time positioning and accurate, detailed maps to negotiate urban and rural areas.

Plus positioning and visualising technologies will expand into other applications in transport. Freight haulers, for example, can use Internet-connected sensors for position, temperature and other data to track the location and status of perishable cargo.

The applications go further than transport, too. Designers are starting to include smart features into their buildings, like blinds that automatically move to block the sun, and a building that conserves energy by finding a way to heat or cool naturally.

And even out onto the street, solving traffic and congestion issues, as well as parking in cities. Imagine a bridge that will provide you with up-to-date information on its congestion. The IoT is already being tested in the USA to synchronize traffic signals. They are also testing sensors in the roads to provide drivers with up-to-date parking information.

With the IoT growing and expanding into all areas and its solutions becoming expected conveniences, it becomes important for those in all areas to be aware of it and that it almost certainly will impact their work in the future.

Customising solutions in the geospatial area

juno_5-water-utilitiesFrom a distance the way many companies use geospatial information looks the same but when you take a close look that’s not the case. Take for example electric and water utilities. They both use GIS to locate and manage assets. They can combine GIS data and customer reports to pinpoint trouble in outages. However electric crews can use meter-level data to locate poles, while water technicians may need centimetre precision to find valves in flooded streets. These different needs require tailored tools.

Ron Bisio, vice president of Trimble Geospatial, discussed a family of new tools that helps solutions providers leverage positioning technologies to create customised solutions in this GISCafe article.